Pupil Premium Strategy Statement 2021/22

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School Overview

Detail Data
School name Grace Academy Darlaston
Number of pupils in school 985 funded for 864
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils 53.7% – 469
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers 2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Date this statement was published December 2021
Date on which it will be reviewed October 22
Statement authorised by Julie Anstey
Pupil premium lead Lynsey Hobson
Governor / Trustee lead Ian Baker

Funding Overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £ 433,911
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £ 68,295
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £ 0
Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£ 502,206

Pupil Premium Strategy Plan

Statement of Intent

The Pupil Premium is additional funding given to publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of students from low-income families who are or have been eligible for free school meals in the past six years, looked after children and previously looked after children, and those from families with parents in the Armed Forces.

One of the Vice Principals oversees the progress of the Pupil Premium cohort, whilst the rest of the leadership team help to raise the profile of these students, and will hold colleagues to account for their progress and attendance. This will be done through a variety of methods. Pupil Premium students are a focus of all pastoral, academic and leadership team meetings.

Barriers Post-pandemic have become increasingly more challenging, and whilst those barriers vary greatly in nature, the EEF guide to Pupil Premium states that placing ‘teaching’ at the heart of its strategy is key to building future success for these students.  At Grace Academy Darlaston, the Pupil Premium funding is spent in a variety of ways; this includes investment in both academic and pastoral initiatives, without the pastoral support the academic challenge becomes even greater and vice versa. 54% of our current cohort is eligible for the Pupil Premium (2021/2022), above the national figure of 20.8%. We measure the impact of interventions and additional funding through attendance, progress and attainment. It is well documented that no single intervention closes the attainment gap, and therefore at GAD we use a variety of approaches with a key focus on individual need.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number Detail of challenge
1 PP students do not achieve as well as their non-PP peers.  Potential further widening of gaps created by school closure/lockdown and absence due to Covid related health issues.
2 Social, emotional and mental health issues for some PP students which impact on behaviour and learning.
3 Many of our PP students are socially, culturally and economically deprived.
4 Lack of aspiration and poor engagement of some students and parents in school life particularly affecting disadvantaged students.
5 Levels of Attendance of PP students is lower than non-PP students.
6 Higher rates of persistent absence among PP students.

Intended Outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome Success criteria
To raise attainment and levels of progress for disadvantaged pupils so they achieve as well as their peers. Attainment and progress gaps between PP students and non-PP decreases.
To improve KS3 literacy and numeracy skills so PP students can access a full and broad curriculum and are well equipped for GCSEs. Disadvantaged students make or exceed expected progress with improved literacy and numeracy skills.
Further develop resilience and mental wellbeing in students in PP students Better outcomes for PP students who struggle with behaviour, mental health and emotional issues.
Further opportunities for disadvantaged students to have access to an appropriate curriculum and a broad range of learning experiences outside of the classroom. Disadvantaged students are engaged in lessons, have high aspirations and are motivated to succeed. Increased rates of participation in extra-curricular activities
Increased attendance at school events for PP students/parents and engagement with school life. Percentage of parents attending parents’ evenings at least matches that of other students.
Improved attendance rates for disadvantaged students Attendance in line with school target of 95%

Activity In This Academic Year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £140,810

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
VP responsible for PP strategy to consistently review the strategy and implement  actions The members of leadership with responsibility in this area oversees the triangulation of the ‘Early Intervention Programme’, linked with attendance interventions, behaviour interventions, parental engagement and curriculum build in order to have desired impact outlined in this plan. 1
AP with responsibility of T&L to look at curriculum/department approach to PP progress The member of leadership with responsibility for the curriculum/department approach to PP progress monitors and evaluates the impact of current strategies on PP students and intevene where necessary 1
CPD Collaborative learning approaches are  outlined as having 5 months’ worth of impact by the EEF toolkit.

High Quality CPD impact on pupils

1
Enhanced leadership roles in key subjects to support with progress of PP pupils Examples given by the EEF to ensure effective teachers are front of students through recruitment and retention. 1

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £296,072

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
HLTA/Learning Support Assistants The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions from teaching assistants and classroom support has a positive impact on pupil’s progress. 1 & 2
SEND support The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions from teaching assistants and classroom support has a positive impact on pupil’s progress. 1 & 2
Increased staffing in English and maths to allow for smaller group sizes and targeted interventions Reducing class sizes can result in 3 months additional progress (EEF). 1 & 2
Year 11 English Lunchtime Intervention Club Previous success with improvements in progress for PP students who took part, experiences of aspiration intervention is referenced in the EEF and having the potential for positive impact. 1, 3 & 4
Year 11 After School Intervention The EEF toolkit suggests that extending time in school has been shown to have 3 months’ worth of impact. 1, 3 & 4
Data Manager – Intervention triggered by data provision and analysis Evidence suggests that collection and analysis of data on groups and individual pupils. 1
Use of external training providers to support with teaching and learning strategies The most impactful strategy outline in the EEF relates to students being able to self-regulate and apply metacognition techniques – evidence suggests it contributes to 8 months’ worth of progress. 1, 2 & 4

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £66,770

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Use of external training providers to support with PP student’s behaviour and well-being EIF’s report on adolescent mental health found good evidence that interventions support young people’s social and emotional skills and can reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. 2, 3 & 4
External Mentoring – use of outside provider for group work and 1-2-1 support for PP students identified as needing further support One to one tuition has been shown to have 5 months of positive impact.  Similarly, ‘mentoring’ has been identified as having 2 months of impact.  A combination of both strategies is used with PP students. 2, 3 & 4
Role of Attendance officer slightly changed in order to have more time to work on initiatives to reduce level of persistent absenteeism, alongside the attendance administrator EEF ‘wider strategies’ page 9 states that good attendance means that stakeholders understood and follow school systems to make early identification and thus interventions, ending in improvement in attendance.

A large part of this work is through parental engagement, which the EEF toolkit suggests adds 4 months of impact.

5 & 6
‘Early Intervention Programme’ introduced in order to improve outcomes for PP students reduce number of PP students moving to EHL3 EEF toolkit states that ‘Evidence suggests that, on average, behaviour interventions can produce moderate improvements in academic performance with a decrease in problematic behaviours.’

Behaviour interventions have been highlighted as having 4 months’ worth of impact using the EEF toolkit.

The EEF toolkit references parental engagement as having 4 months’ worth of impact.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6
Enrichment + initiative – targeted PP students Arts participation has been highlighted as low cost and moderate impact adding on 3 months as part of the EEF toolkit.

Experiences of aspiration intervention is referenced in the EEF and having the potential for positive impact.

1, 2, 3 & 4
Hardship Support to support the needs of PP students and their families The EEF toolkit references parental engagement as having 4 months’ worth of impact. The hardship support helps to facilitate this engagement with the parents of PP pupils. 3 ,4, 5 & 6
Revision Guides for PP students The EEF toolkit references parental engagement as having 4 months’ worth of impact. The hardship support helps to facilitate this engagement with the parents of PP pupils. 1 & 3
Extra – Curricular activities targeting PP students Arts participation has been highlighted as low cost and moderate impact adding on 3 months as part of the EEF toolkit.

Experiences of aspiration intervention is referenced in the EEF and having the potential for positive impact.

1, 3 & 4
Subsidised trips and visits for PP students Experiences of aspiration intervention is referenced in the EEF and having the potential for positive impact. 1, 3 & 4
DofE – targeting PP students to participate Experiences of aspiration intervention is referenced in the EEF and having the potential for positive impact. 3 & 4
Literacy Resources and Initiatives for PP students Reading comprehension strategies have been highlighted as having 6 months’ worth of impact using the EEF toolkit. 1

 Total 2021/22 budgeted cost: £503,652

 

2020/21 Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil Premium Strategy Outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Our internal assessments during 2020/21 suggested that the performance of disadvantaged pupils was lower than in the previous years in key areas of the curriculum.

Despite being on track during the first year (2018/19), the outcomes we aimed to achieve in our previous strategy by the end of 2020/21 were therefore not fully realised.

Our assessment of the reasons for these outcomes points primarily to Covid-19 impact, which disrupted all of our subject areas to varying degrees. As evidenced in schools across the country, partial closure was most detrimental to our disadvantaged pupils, and they were not able to benefit from our pupil premium funded improvements to teaching and targeted interventions to the degree that we intended. The impact was mitigated by our resolution to maintain a high quality curriculum, including during periods of partial closure, which was aided by use of online resources as part of our digital strategy.

Although overall attendance in 2020/21 was lower than in the preceding years. At times when all pupils were expected to attend school, absence among disadvantaged pupils was higher than their peers and persistent absence was also higher. These gaps are larger than in previous years, which is why attendance is a focus of our current plan.

Our assessments demonstrated that pupil behaviour, wellbeing and mental health were significantly impacted last year, primarily due to COVID-19-related issues. The impact was particularly acute for disadvantaged pupils. We used pupil premium funding to provide wellbeing support for all pupils, and targeted interventions where required. We are building on that approach in our new plan.

Externally Provided Programmes

Programme Provider
Mentoring (1-2-1 and group support) Think For The Future
Mentoring (1-2-1 and group support) Base 25
Mentoring (1-2-1 and group support) Michael’s Mentors

Pupil Premium Spend Breakdown 2020/21

Pupil Premium Funding 20/21
Pupil Premium Allocation 20/21 £439,973
B/fwd from 19/20 £o
£439,973
Percentage of Disadvantaged Students % 55.4%
Pupil Premium Spend 2020/21
Staffing Total
HLTAs £37,097
Teaching Assistants £89,920
Learning Support and Teaching Assistants £29,695
Attendance Intervention and Safeguarding £91,466
Teaching and Learning Coaching Support £47,967
Behaviour Support £42,823
Pastoral Care £93,259
Teaching and Learning
CPD £4,837
Pixl £3,430
Kerboodle £838
GL Assessments  £1,049
Mymaths £349
Literacy/Numeracy/EAL Resources £2,685
Student Support
Peripatetic Music Lessons £2,640
Total Costs as at 31/08/20 £448,055
Additional Investment £8,082

Examples of how this funding has been used include:

  • Offering specific academic mentoring and other bespoke support for targeted disadvantaged students
  • Assigning additional budgets to core subjects and senior leaders so that resources can be provided for disadvantaged students
  • Paying for additional staffing hours for targeted enrichment at weekends and other non-school days
  • Renewing licences for educational resources, including GCSEPod, Nessy, Duolingo, Mymaths and PiXL code.
  • Targeting those disadvantaged students with poor attendance with additional bespoke support

Evidence of impact:

Due to COVID 19 and the cancellation of exams it isn’t possible to compare our disadvantaged students progress to their peers nationally using the progress 8 measure.

However, following a stringent TAG process, we are proud to say that all of our pupils performed well this year with our disadvantaged and non – disadvantaged pupils gaining good progress when compared to their starting points.

Whilst we are proud of our achievements and the results our students received, we are prioritising the following areas to further improve the quality of education that we deliver to all of our students including our most disadvantaged.

  1. Raise the attainment of our disadvantaged students ensuring more of the students gain grades 4’s and 5’s or above in English and Maths.
  2. Implement strategies to ensure disadvantaged students “catch up” on missed learning following the school closures to ensure accelerated progress is sustained.
  3. Continue to narrow the gap between the percentage attendance of disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students.

Impact upon specific groups: Provision examples 

Provision Desired outcomes Evaluation 2020/2021
Whole Academy interventions Whole academy interventions, raise achievement and improve progress of disadvantaged students. Progress achieved by disadvantaged students resulted in above expected grades given through the teacher assessed grade process
Attendance Raise achievement and progress through increased attendance to the Academy. Disadvantaged attendance was inline with national average
Mentoring and behaviour support Improve behaviour in lessons and reduce visits to refocus. Increase resilience of students and support of independent learning. Reduction in behavioural incidences and fewer seriously disruptive incidences from key targeted students
Pupil Premium intervention for students with low KS2 scores in KS3. Raising progress for pupils who did not reach the required standard at the end of Key Stage 2. Targeted Strategies, initiatives and interventions for all identified pupils Progress achieved by students. In class targeted interventions and the nessy programme excelled students reading ages.

Date of next Pupil Premium strategy review – October 2022